“Name Origins” now published at Cheap Pop.

My dissertation is rigid, POV-wise, and it’s been a while since I’ve worked on a long form first person story. To compensate, these short monologues show up on my blank pages from time to time. Here is my latest one of those.

Also, related: I have never named a child. I have named two dogs, though, after American music icons. We’ve got Woody Guthrie (the bigger one) and Elmore James (the littlest).

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“A Hand for Scale” in Fiction Southeast

My latest flash piece has been published!

I’m noticing a recurring image with my writing: canoes. This is probably because I went on an annual canoe trip every year between ages 5-18. By the end of those years, I was pretty tired of canoes. Luckily I’ve since discovered kayaks, which are much easier to paddle because we don’t have to depend on others.

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As for the story, I’m excited about this one.

You can access it here.

More Fun with Nominations

The American Literary Review nominated “Miss Thailand Country Band” for a Pushcart.

I wrote that story ten years ago with a prompt from writer, Jim Heynan: Write about something that is off-limits.

“Ready for Glory” is up at Carolina Quarterly, and a few words about my DUBLINERS Project.

Carolina Quartly has published my story, “Ready for Glory,” on their website this week. This is the first I’ve published from an ongoing project I’ve been working on as part of my Ph.D, which is to “adapt” (I put quotes because I’m still trying to figure out what that means) the stories in James Joyce’s DUBLINERS to stories about present day Detroit.

It’s exciting to have “Ready for Glory” out first, because it is based on the first story in Dubliners, “The Sisters.”  Take a look if you wanna.

The second story, based on “The Encounter” has also already found a home. News about that is coming soon.

The first few were easiest because they are about childhood, something I love to write about, and because they are in first person. As the project progresses, it gets trickier, but I’m also embarking on the challenges that have drawn me to the project in the first place: to learn how Joyce uses point of view. With every story, I’ve been enjoying finding parallels with early 20th century Dublin and early 21st century Detroit. There are more than I’d imagined.

And another one…

My creepy story, "Trespassers," is now live on the Sequestrum website. It won runner up in their New Writers contest.

It's about Detroit in the wintertime, so a good one to read while you're sweating in August, especially sweating in Atlanta August, like I have been.

Enjoy.

Two New and Very Different Stories

It’s been a while since I updated this, but I have had a couple of stories published in 2017. One is in a print journal, one is online.

The print story is, “As Though She Could Actually Do SomethinPR-Issue-60-Cover-730x1024g,” which appeared in the Potomac Review, just in time for AWP in Washington DC. For a nice surprise, my friend, Kilby Allen, also had a story in there called “Everything Neatly Put Away.”

“As Though She Could Actually Do Something” is based on an experience I had in Thailand when I accompanied some American friends when they took their sons to see a movie at a fancy mall in Bangkok. The majority of the story is fabricated (that’s why it’s billed as fiction), but the strange chaos of doing something that is mostly familiar in a place where everything appears in a new language stayed with me for a long time. It seemed story-worthy to me.

You can read other online, “New Translations,” which appeared in the latest issue of Quarterly West. I wrote that one after accidentally getting sucked into browsing my Twitter feed during writing time, and I stumbled across an article that explained how we might have been reading a Bible verse from Genesis wrong all these years. That concept catapulted into a flash piece. I hope you enjoy it!

Two of my friends who happen to be amazing poets, Caroline Crew and Anne Barngrover, have some killer poems in that killer issue.